Practice Management

Vegas Awaits: Hospital Medicine 2017

I’m packing up for Vegas. I always look forward to the yearly conference. And back in Vegas, expectations are high. However, we all know there will be one or two distractions from the conference schedule. Here are few takeaways I hope to obtain from both the conference and Vegas. Building Community The Power of Networking Placing the Right Bets The Importance of Arts AYCE Benefits Building Community While I’m in Vegas, I may wander north of the strip and head for Container Park and the Downtown Project. The Zappos CEO poured $350 million of his wealth into this downtown Las Vegas project, with the goal of rapidly building a community from scratch as start-up city. Health can be impacted by the design of a city, and many cities are taking that cue. The Downtown Project wanted to create a walkable city and a new tech industry while experimenting with city building at the private level.…

Building a Practice that People Want to be Part Of

As those of you who have followed my posts on this blog know, I’ve been spending a lot of time mulling over issues related to hospitalist job satisfaction and career sustainability. I’ve written about concrete things like re-thinking hospitalist work schedules and minimizing low-value interruptions, as well as more abstract concepts like assessing your group’s “gross happiness index.” My fascination with these issues and my concern about their potential impact on the specialty of hospital medicine eventually led John and me, as course directors, to the theme of this year’s practice management pre-course at HM17 – Practice Management Success Strategies: Building a Practice That People Want to Be Part Of. Perhaps, like me, you are interested in digging deeper into matters of career satisfaction and sustainability. Or perhaps you are simply focused on the more mundane struggle just to recruit and retain enough qualified providers for your group. In either…

We Are All Accomplices In The Great American Coding Swindle

"Membership in the American Academy of Professional Coders has risen to more than 170,000 today from roughly 70,000 in 2008." "The AMA owns the copyright to CPT, the code used by doctors. It publishes coding books and dictionaries. It also creates new codes when doctors want to charge for a new procedure. It levies a licensing fee on billing companies for using CPT codes on bills. Royalties for CPT codes, along with revenues from other products, are the association’s biggest single source of income" Aint that something? Okay, I would rank Elizabeth Rosenthal up there with Atul Gawande and Lisa Rosenbaum in the pantheon of standout healthcare writers active today.  They are all docs and have more skill in their writing pinky than I have in my entire body. They have a unique talent in stitching together narratives that speak to both docs and patients in their language--and do it within…

We Go to the Altar Together

Last month, I wrote about onboarding and the important responsibility that everyone associated with a hospitalist program has to ensure that each new provider quickly comes to believe he or she made a terrific choice to join the group. Upon reflection, it seems important to address the other side of this equation. I’m talking about the responsibilities that each candidate has when deciding whether to apply for a job, to interview, and to accept or reject a group’s offer. The relationship between a hospitalist and the group he or she is part of is a lot like a marriage. Both parties go to the altar together, and the relationship is most likely to be successful when both enter it with their eyes open, having done their due diligence, and with an intention to align their interests and support each other. Here are some things every hospitalist should be thinking about as…

Does Your Onboarding Process Really Get Folks On Board?

Not long ago, I had a conversation with a good friend who is the hospitalist medical director for a five-hospital health system in the northeast. We were commiserating about how hard it is to recruit new hospitalists to rural and small-town settings and the high risk of rapid turnover despite all the energy invested in recruiting and onboarding them. As we discussed how new hospitalists are oriented into his organization, I learned that like most hospitalist groups, my friend’s group focuses onboarding efforts on making sure that new providers know how to find their way around the hospital and use the EHR, complete required training modules, are credentialed with payors, and are aware of applicable policies and procedures. They also see this time as a probationary period to ensure the new group member has adequate clinical skills and behavioral competencies. This conversation got me thinking about the crucial relationship between…
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