Patient Satisfaction

It’s Time for a Buzz Cut

I sometimes joke that hospitalists are the medicine version of the mullet haircut – you know, all business in "the front" (i.e. the patient care area) and all party in "the back" (i.e. the work room). In "the back", the usual scenario is to complain and moan about our frequent flyers, our drug seekers, our many unsaveable patients, the incredible situations ("He put a nail where??), with good-natured but somewhat bitter truculence about sharing duties with housestaff and general whining about hospital leadership. Generally, as long as these semi-inappropriate conversations and remarks were kept "backstage", and our demeanor was professional "onstage", I felt it was harmless. You know, gallows humor. A coping mechanism. And often entertaining. But there was always a part of me that wondered if these "backstage" conversations were having a more corrosive impact on communication with our patients. Does it normalize a negative judgement about patients if…

Is Patient-Centered Care Bad for Resident Education? #JHMChat Explores #meded & #ptexp

The term “patient-centered” has become a healthcare buzzword and was certainly popularized by the creation of the patient-centered medical home in ambulatory care. In the inpatient world, patient-centered rounds symbolizes this effort to improve patient experience and is the subject of a new study in this month’s Journal of Hospital Medicine, which we'll discuss on next Monday's #JHMChat at 9 p.m. EST on Twitter. In a randomized trial, Brad Monash and UCSF colleagues explored the impact of patient-centered rounds on patient experience. Patient-centered rounds was a bundle of 5 evidence-based practices: 1) pre-rounds huddle; 2) bedside rounds; 3) nurse integration; 4) real-time order entry; and 5) whiteboard updates. The control group continued with routine practice of attending rounds. The study was impressive for several reasons, but one in particular caught my attention – an army of 30 pre-med students volunteered to be observers (and also get shadowing experience?) to monitor…

The Nursing Home Get Out of Jail Card (“We Don’t Want Our Patient Back”). It’s Now Adios.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has not updated its rules ("conditions for participation") for nursing homes in twenty-five years. Late last year they finally did. Many of the changes will have an impact on the daily lives of NH residents but are far removed from hospital medicine.  Think a resident's ability to pick their own roommate and have all hours visitors.  However, there are a few changes that intersect with HM, and a notable one will affect how you respond to a frequently encountered roadblock long-term care facilities sometimes throw our way. First, though, some of the changes CMS finalized.  With SHM members now moving into the post-acute and LTC realm, several have real relevance (I only cite a sliver of them): (more…)

Fake News! Get Your Fake News Here!

One of the top stories of 2016 is fake news. Chances are, in 2017, we will continue to fall for these fairy tales. When people think Obamacare and the Affordable Care Act are two completely different entities, we know facts can dissipate quickly. Why are we duped so easily? These stories fit into a narrative we want to believe in, reinforcing our often insular views, where the echo chamber reverberates at high frequency. We digest only headlines and forward those along, not having time to fully read the stories. Lack of faith in the "media" causes us to trust any headline from any source over the mainstream media. Facebook is recognizing the large role it plays in dissemination of fake stories to the extent that it plans to roll out a new filter in Germany to begin to fight this epidemic. Here's how you and others can combat fake news…

The Inmates Are Running the Asylum

OK; that might be a bit of an exaggeration. But if you left your clinical shift asking why you feel so depleted and frustrated and why you had that negative interaction with that patient, you should do yourself a favor and read the recent review in the Journal of Hospital Medicine entitled "When Personality Is the Problem: Managing Patients with Difficult Personalities on the Acute Care Unit". In this article, it notes that about 4-15% of the population is affected by at least one personality disorder and that this prevalence is thought to be much higher in those seeking healthcare services – perhaps as high as 25% of the population. This is thought to be due to in part to lifestyle factors, such as drinking and drug use, as well as the fact that individuals who possess these dysfunctional personality structures may have difficulty accessing and utilizing care adequately. These…
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