Operations

We Are Not Done Changing

Recently, the on-line version of JAMA published an original investigation entitled "Patient Mortality During Unannounced Accreditation Surveys at US Hospitals". The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effect of heightened vigilance during unannounced accreditation surveys on safety and quality of inpatient care. The authors found that there was a significant reduction in mortality in patients admitted during the week of surveys by The Joint Commission. The change was more significant in major teaching hospitals, where mortality fell from 6.41% to 5.93% during survey weeks, a 5.9% relative decrease. The positive effects of being monitored have been well documented in all kinds of arenas, such as hand washing and antibiotic stewardship. But mortality? This is an interesting outcome, especially considering a recent ordeal I went through with my dear sister-in-law. She was on vacation in a somewhat remote location and suffers from a chronic illness, which requires her to…

Overcoming a Continued Physician Shortage

Updated statistics from the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) show that the United States will continue to face a physician shortage over the next decade, ranging from a conservative estimate of a shortfall of approximately 40,000 to a pessimistic estimate of about 105,000 by 2030. The statistics are based on modeling a variety of policy and health care scenarios over the next 10-20 years to determine what the physician workforce requirements will be compared to the expected pipeline. Although the current and projected healthcare landscape is complex, dynamic, and uncertain, every estimate projects a shortage that is significant enough to affect patient care in the United States. The US population is both growing and aging, which creates an ongoing need for hospitalists and hospital-based patient care; between 2015 and 2030, the US population aged 65 and older will increase by 55%. Hospitalist groups will not only be impacted by…

We Are All Accomplices In The Great American Coding Swindle

"Membership in the American Academy of Professional Coders has risen to more than 170,000 today from roughly 70,000 in 2008." "The AMA owns the copyright to CPT, the code used by doctors. It publishes coding books and dictionaries. It also creates new codes when doctors want to charge for a new procedure. It levies a licensing fee on billing companies for using CPT codes on bills. Royalties for CPT codes, along with revenues from other products, are the association’s biggest single source of income" Aint that something? Okay, I would rank Elizabeth Rosenthal up there with Atul Gawande and Lisa Rosenbaum in the pantheon of standout healthcare writers active today.  They are all docs and have more skill in their writing pinky than I have in my entire body. They have a unique talent in stitching together narratives that speak to both docs and patients in their language--and do it within…

Dont Compare HM Group Part B Costs Hospital to Hospital. It’s About the Variation Between Individuals.

I have been and will be light on the blogging these days.  However, a new JAMA online first study out looking at hospitalist Part B cost variation deserves some attention.  Bestill my heart.  It's not about groups.  It's about individual physicians.  The gap between high- and low-spending doctors in the same hospital was larger than the gap in spending between hospitals. From the editorial: In this issue, Tsugawa et al3 analyze spending by individual physicians in relation to patient outcomes. The research team compared Medicare Part B spending per hospitalization by hospitalists practicing within the same hospital. To profile each physician’s level of spending, average Part B spending per hospitalization for 2011 and 2012 was used, then applied to clinical outcomes (30-day readmission and 30-day mortality rates) for 2013 and 2014. The split-sample approach mitigates bias if a physician treats a complex set of patients in one year and therefore has…

The Upside of Anger

Recently, I heard from a number of NP/PA providers in response to Dr. John Nelson’s editorial published in the January edition of The Hospitalist. In the editorial, Dr. Nelson refers to an article in the Journal of Clinical Outcomes. The single-site study compared routine versus expanded PA care in a community hospital, and the intervention group delivered a three percent reduction in costs with similar measures in quality. In discussing the results, Dr. Nelson concluded that this article showed that, with proper planning and infrastructure, care delivered primarily by PAs can go "OK". Many of you took offense at the lack of enthusiasm or support for the model studied and felt that it demonstrated poor understanding for the migration of roles for NP/PA providers in hospital medicine. So who is right? Was it merely one tiny study that showed “OK” results? Or was it an impactful article that demonstrates the…
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