HM15 – Annual Meeting

Getting on the Bus: Hospitalists on the Hill

by Regina Heyl DePietro I sat in the office of a staffer to a Manhattan congressman and waited for the right moment to tell my story about my mother’s experience with advanced directives. Dr. Celine Goetz, a hospitalist from Mount Sinai, and I had practiced our talk in a large atrium a floor below. Our morning meeting led by SHM had prepped us on three points: 1. Address Medicare’s onerous three-day rule 2. Push for doctor funding and reimbursement in preparing advanced directives 3. Discuss the Medicare Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) Dr. Goetz had taken me under her wing when she learned I was from New York. She had decided that this day was going to be as memorable for me as her first day advocating on the Hill when she was in medical school. Worried that I would fumble, I told her that I was not going to speak,…

Congratulations, Drs. Wachter, Conway and Murthy

Imagine for a minute that you’re Bob Wachter. Last week, you introduced your book to more than 3,000 hospitalists at Hospital Medicine 2015 on a Wednesday. Then, on Saturday, your photo is on the cover of Modern Healthcare and you find yourself at the top of the list of its top 50 most influential physician executives. [caption id="attachment_12310" align="alignright" width="150"] Dr. Wachter reading from his new book last week at Hospital Medicine 2015.[/caption] His rise to thought leadership isn't accidental. It’s the product of decades of commitment, insight and genuine compassion for hospitalized patients. And Dr. Wachter is not unique in his rise to national influence in healthcare. Hospitalists are trained and well suited to lead national efforts to improve patient care at all levels of our healthcare system. For the first time ever, three hospitalists – Drs. Wachter (number one), Patrick Conway (11) and Vivek Murthy (17) – were…

Refreshed, Re-energized and Ready for Another Year

One of my favorite things about being a hospitalist is attending the annual SHM meeting. I look forward to making new friends, reconnecting with old colleagues, and learning about what's happening across the country. With so many opportunities to connect and educational tracks to learn from, this year’s conference did not disappoint in the slightest. HM 2015 opened with a discussion of how to take quality to the next level. Hospitalists were once again placed at the forefront of the changing healthcare system, and were encouraged to lead transformational change. In this era of cost-consciousness, it was good to see the organization vigorously support efforts like Choosing Wisely and high-value care. These and other quality initiatives are ones that I personally champion in my daily practice, and I loved HM15's positive reinforcement of that! One interesting new event was the case competition organized around the Choosing Wisely campaign. Hospitalists from…

The Porridge Is Just Right: Choosing Wisely®

by John B. Bulger, DO, MBA It began in the spring of 2012. A small sub-group of the Society of Hospital Medicine’s (SHM) Hospital Quality and Patient Safety Committee (HQPS) was given the task of coming up with five test and treatments that hospitalists overuse. The pediatric hospitalist community was already hard at work (and quite far ahead) on their list. An adult list was needed. It was early June and five were required by August. Starting prolifically with 160 candidates, a mix of opinion and science, leadership and rank and file, rigor and pragmatism cut the list to five – really six, but we couldn’t figure out a way to present one of them in the ABIM required negative (avoid or don’t do) syntax. From SHM board approval in August to the release in February of 2013, the lists waited out a Presidential election and other media cycles. Manuscripts…

Does This Learner Really Stink?

by Dr. Calvin Chou MD, PhD I recently finished service with a struggling intern. This intern (I’ll call her Mary) had “achieved” a reputation for being deficient in clinical reasoning, disorganized, argumentative, and unwilling to receive feedback. None of this had been communicated with me before I began work with her, but on rounds the very first day I noticed there was something – she was touchy when I revised her assessment of euvolemia in a CHF patient whose neck veins were up to the ear lobes. After rounds, my new resident asked to meet privately with me, listed the concerns he had heard from previous residents, and stated how anxious he was to supervise Mary. Fortunately, I have some expertise in situations like this, having recently co-edited a book entitled Remediation in Medical Education: A Midcourse Correction. (I’ll also be presenting at Hospital Medicine 2015 in March.) Though the…
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