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You think you know what predictive analytics means, huh?

Brad Flansbaum
Jul 20, 2014 | No Comments

  This month’s Health Affairs dedicates itself to the subject of big data, a term in the news quite a bit these days.  If you think you know what big data implies, mainly dredging data sets to build the clinical decision support in your EMRs, you would be incorrect. We are talking much, much bigger. One article grabbed my attention,...

  • Top 10 Patient Safety Concerns for Hospitalists
    Danielle Scheurer
    Jul 17, 2014 | No Comments

    This list is a worthy read for hospitalists; it’s entitled, “Top 10 patient safety concerns for health care organizations.” This list is created annually by the ECRI Institute, which analyzes approximately a half-million patient safety events from more than 1,200 US hospitals, to determine what represents the highest risk for patient safety. Those that “made” the Top 10 List this...

  • It Takes a Village – Part I: What I learned from my in-laws’ Thanksgiving dinner
    Guest Post
    Jul 16, 2014 | 1 Comment

    by Dr. Ryan Brown MD, FACP It seems like it was just yesterday that I first walked into Thanksgiving dinner at my in-laws’ and remembered thinking to myself, “What did I get myself into?” Coming from a very small family, I had never been exposed to the chaos that comes from letting 70 people loose in an elementary school cafeteria...

  • PNA, CHF, MI. Rinse. Repeat.
    Brad Flansbaum
    Jul 15, 2014 | 3 Comments

    Think of the drunk looking for his lost car keys under the only light post in a parking lot.  As unlikely as he might find the keys, he does use logic in his approach despite his low odds of success. We use readmits for the same reason.  We have mediocre tools to assess outcomes, but nothing better exists.  We use readmissions because we do...

  • What’s it like to testify in front of Congress? One of our own speaks…
    Brad Flansbaum
    Jul 10, 2014 | No Comments

      Most people think legislators and they envision representatives bickering about deals never to be, in a big crusty room, with portraits of the founding fathers staring down from on high. Kind of true, but our elected officials serve another role often overlooked. Each house of congress has a committee system, and these bodies serve a unique role distinct from...

  • What are we thinking? Part 1
    What are we thinking? Part 1
    Tracy Cardin
    Jul 8, 2014 | 3 Comments

    My patient was a 69 year old lady with metastatic small cell lung cancer. She was on experimental chemotherapy and was admitted from clinic with worsening lower extremity edema and a new oxygen requirement.  She underwent a chest and abdominal CT that revealed new pulmonary masses, tumor and a mass invading her right pulmonary artery, a new loculated pleural effusion,...

  • What does the World Cup and Hospital Medicine have in common?
    Brad Flansbaum
    Jul 5, 2014 | Comments Off

    Ask Tim Howard.  He’ll tell you.   For real.   Not joking.   Click here.   And have a great holiday!

  • Hospital Docs: To round on Only One Floor, or Not to?
    Hospital Docs: To round on Only One Floor, or Not to?
    Suneel Dhand
    Jun 30, 2014 | 2 Comments

    A major debate taking place in the hospital medicine community over the last several years concerns the way in which we cohort patients on the medical floors. The traditional way is to have patients belonging to each doctor scattered across the hospital on several different floors. This is in contrast to designing a geographical system where all the patients for...

  • You Can Observe A Lot by Just Watching.
    You Can Observe A Lot by Just Watching.
    Jordan Messler
    Jun 26, 2014 | 5 Comments

    “You can observe a lot by just watching.” -Yogi Berra “You see, but you do not observe.” - Sherlock Holmes, A Scandal In Bohemia. Sir Arthur Conan Doyle I walked into the patient’s room day after day and heard the same line. “Sorry, Doc…not ready to get home. My breathing is still bad.” He was sitting up, resting on the...

  • Knowing What We Don’t Know
    Knowing What We Don’t Know
    Brett Hendel-Paterson
    Jun 24, 2014 | Comments Off

    I thought I would start this month’s blog post with a case. A 36 year-old previously healthy woman presented 5 days into an illness which began with fever, fatigue, severe joint pain, painful mouth sores, and a diffuse skin rash. Her fever lasted 48 hours, and she has been afebrile since. She continues to have severe debilitating joint pain, fatigue,...

  • Women, Leadership & Hospital Medicine: Lean In
    Guest Post
    Jun 19, 2014 | 2 Comments

    by Dr. Rachel George MD, MBA, CPE, SFHM It is time for women in hospital medicine to sit at the table, pursue our ambitions, and change the conversation to what we can do to transform patient care. One year ago Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook, published her best-selling novel Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead encouraging women...

  • Let the Countdown Begin: EMR Re-Launch
    Let the Countdown Begin: EMR Re-Launch
    Danielle Scheurer
    Jun 17, 2014 | 1 Comment

    The current state of the electronic medical record (EMR) at my organization feels like being in an old hospital complex which has clearly been built up over the course of decades; room numbers are not necessarily logical or in sequence, buildings connect on different floors, and most elevators do not actually go all the way from the bottom to the...

  • Should Doctors Work for Hospitals?
    Should Doctors Work for Hospitals?
    Burke Kealey
    Jun 12, 2014 | Comments Off

    A recent article in The Atlantic  posited this very question and mostly points out the ills of this arrangement.  The article points to data from the American Hospital Association showing that the number of physicians employed by hospitals grew by 34% between 2000 and 2010. The article points out financial reasons that hospitals want to employ doctors.  To avoid any illegality,...

  • Frankenstein’s Monster
    Tracy Cardin
    Jun 10, 2014 | Comments Off

    I’m afraid this blog post will be a bit of a rant, having just been fired by a patient. This patient was tragic and miserable with the rolling eyes and flaring nostrils of a wild horse confronted with a rattlesnake. And I, dear reader, was the rattlesnake. And what could have possibly been the crime for which I was so...

  • Oh, what to do about that background hospital beeping?!
    Suneel Dhand
    Jun 5, 2014 | Comments Off

    You enter a patient’s room, begin a conversation, and then hear it. It may be from your patient’s machine, or the next bed; from the intravenous infusion or the telemetry monitor. “Beep, beep, beep!” What do you do? Do you: A. Look into the situation yourself and work out what’s wrong? B. Try to silence the alarm immediately? C. Call...

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