Archive for August 2016

Hospitality and Art in Medicine: A Response to Sarah Candler, MD’s “Medical Map-Making”

by John David Ike
By: John David (JD) Ike As a medical student, much of my time and energy is spent studying the sciences. For the better part of my day, I pour through online resources, question banks and medical journals to learn the facts necessary to succeed on the wards and on the boards. Little to no time is spent discussing the broader implications of medicine on society, the tenets of medical professionalism, and the history of the medical profession. Most importantly, no time is spent discussing the arts – the tangible elements that display and celebrate our shared humanity and highlight our values, beliefs and traditions. As an appreciator of the arts with a research interest in the intersection of visual art and medicine, I found an opportunity to explore this topic as a teaching assistant for an Emory University undergraduate study abroad course in Italy titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts.”…
John David (JD) is a fourth-year medical student at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta, GA. Prior to attending medical school, JD earned his Bachelor of Arts in Art History at Davidson College in Davidson, NC. While at Davidson, JD explored many topics related to the art of medicine including the manifestation of the medical discourse in Thomas Eakins’ 19th century surgical paintings and the role government and urban design play in control of a populace’s well-being through an exploration of the 19th century “Haussmannization” of Paris, France. While at Emory, JD was able to continue his passion for the medical humanities as a teaching assistant for an undergraduate study abroad course titled, “Medicine, Compassion, and the Arts” and through other related endeavors. He plans to enter internal medicine upon graduation from Emory and hopes to continue to explore his research and teaching interest in the medical humanities. Please feel free to reach out to JD at john.david.ike@emory.edu

Time to #TurnTheTide: No Doctor Should Be Excited about Prescribing Opioids

As a resident, I still remember the day I was so excited that I could prescribe narcotics on my own. I had taken my USMLE part 3 and paid for my DEA number so that I could moonlight at a local community hospital. As an added bonus, I was no longer reliant on an attending to write narcotics scripts. While this may sound trivial, word spread through our residency like wildfire. That week, I got paged daily by an intern whose attending physician had left for the day, and they had patients to discharge on narcotics. After all, it was not uncommon to send patients home with narcotics because they were “having pain” and they needed pain medications to give them the edge they needed to stay out of the hospital. I did not think much of this until 5 years ago, I saw a patient “RC” acutely suffering from…

Hospital Medicine’s 20th Anniversary Makes Media Splash

SHM & Hospital Medicine in the News: August 4 – 18, 2016 Check out the latest hospital medicine and SHM-related stories in mainstream and healthcare-centric news. For the full stories, click on the links below: As SHM celebrates the 20th anniversary of hospital medicine, multiple news outlets picked up the recent release of the special NEJM article penned by Drs. Bob Wachter and Lee Goldman. Coverage included Modern Healthcare, Medscape and UCSF News. Opioid prescribing continues to be a hot topic, with national coverage from The New York Times on the consequences of incorporating pain management into HCAHPS scores. Medscape also placed the spotlight on hospitalists’ struggle of balancing pain management and risk that a patient will overdose. Recent research has shown that geriatric hospital units focused on increased patient mobility could reduce readmissions. SHM member and former Research Committee member Dr. Heidi Wald was quoted in the report in…

A Perfect Storm

What’s a hospitalist leader to do when everything seems to be conspiring against your efforts to ensure a stable, successful hospital medicine practice? I talked recently with a hospitalist leader who is dealing with just such a scenario right now. When I visited his hospitalist practice at a small private health system of around 300 beds in a very attractive – but fairly rural – part of the country a couple of years ago, the hospitalist group of 21 docs and 5 NP/PAs was stable and high-functioning. They wanted help primarily with a few schedule and compensation issues, and they also wanted to be proactive in addressing some nascent angst related to a couple of recently-piloted work flow changes. Through our work together the group made several adjustments that were well received by the providers, and the last time I talked with the medical director things seemed to be going…

Your Career Path. Did You Get Pushed or Pulled?

I recently read the following written by Daniel Ofri, MD in the NYT: The stereotype of specialists handling the more complex and intellectually challenging cases makes many generalists fume. Generalists observe that specialists get the “simplicity” of handling very narrow slivers of medicine. It’s much easier to be an expert when you only have a handful of diseases to worry about. And any issue that a specialist doesn’t want to deal with can be permissibly kicked back to the generalist. The generalist, however, gets no dispensation. Every issue that the patient raises must be addressed. Every symptom from any organ has to be acknowledged. Plus, every medication prescribed by every specialist must be accounted for. Every competing interest between the many medical cooks in today’s fragmented health care environment must be integrated. It brought to mind something else I saw of late--Modern Healthcare's physician compensation survey.  The publication obtained data from…
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