Archive for April 2016

A Link between Hospitalist Morale and Retention?

Many observers of our specialty tend to think of hospitalists as itinerant shift workers, many of whom have little emotional commitment to the organization that employs them and will quickly decide to leave for another job where the grass is greener.  Even my colleague John Nelson often describes hospitalists as preferring to “date” rather than “marry” their practice.  And more than one hospital executive has told me, “They’re just going to leave in a couple years anyway, so why should we invest a lot in their development and morale?”   But there’s at least one organization where hospitalist group leaders see things differently, and are working hard to understand the determinants of hospitalist wellbeing and the relationship between wellbeing and retention.  I recently spoke with Dr. Shalini Chandra at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC), lead author of an article recently posted online by the Journal of Hospital Medicine about…

You’ll Receive High-Value Care…Or Your Money back?

As hospitals across the country increasingly focus on patient experience, one health system, as we’ve written about before here on The Hospital Leader, is really putting their money where their mouth is: they are offering patients direct refunds, no questions asked. An article in The Washington Post calls these refunds, “the most unexpected hospital billing development ever.” The article opens with, “At Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania, hospital officials want to keep their customers happy.” Ok, I hear some of you already sharpening your pitchforks. You take care of PATIENTS, not CUSTOMERS. Agreed, but there is something that both of these titles have in common: underneath them are people. Real-life people, who care about how they are treated on a personal level and yes, they want the best possible medical care but they also would like their meal to be edible and their physicians to speak to them with respect,…

ABX Stewardship, Growth of PAs & End-of-Life Care in Hospital Medicine News

by Brett Radler
This issue of SHM & Hospital Medicine in the News features: The potential for CMS to require hospitals to adhere to a formal antibiotic stewardship program in order to receive reimbursement from Medicare The impetus behind and implications of the significant growth of the physician assistant profession over the last five years SHM member Dr. Matthew Hindman on FOX Carolina news, stressing the importance of end-of-life care decisions An explanation in the mainstream media of how the US is bending the healthcare cost curve, highlighting the shift to quality-based reimbursements, among other potential solutions The perceived lack of correlation between price and healthcare quality by consumers The higher case complexity and associated cost to treat children at rural medical centers versus those at urban medical centers Antibiotics Stewardship Enters Play-to-Pay Arena At some point in the very near future, your hospital may have to certify its adherence to a formal…
Brett Radler is the Communications Specialist at the Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM). He is responsible for managing the day-to-day social media engagement across SHM’s social media platforms, including Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and YouTube, and assists in the management of SHM’s blog, The Hospital Leader. In addition to his social media roles, Brett develops content for SHM’s monthly newsmagazine, The Hospitalist, and monitors media coverage relevant to the hospital medicine movement. Brett holds a bachelor’s degree in Communication from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ and also serves as on-air talent at a New Jersey radio station in his spare time.

I left a pharma-sponsored research project. My reasons for doing so may be instructive.

  Not long back, I departed a pharma-sponsored research project.  I based my decision to leave in something I occasioned over a decade ago.  I thought it was time to share the episode and the lessons learned given the attention being paid to physician conflict of interest nowadays (as well as the annual Open Payments review and dispute period approaching). When I finished training, very few docs practiced hospital medicine—or even knew what the term hospitalist meant.  Several forward-thinking medical centers hitched their wagons to the hospitalist model, as did some astute information technology and staffing companies. However, few healthcare players embraced the hospitalist movement in a serious fashion like the pharmaceutical industry.  They realized hospitalists prescribed a narrow band of products, in big lots, within a centralized location.  The higher ups in the pharma sector saw the benefits in directing reps our way. Consistent with those goals, a physician…

Quality Improvement – The Role of Each Provider

by Dr. Moises Auron
by Dr. Moises Auron MD, FAAP, FACP It is certain that since the seminal publication of the Institute of Medicine “To Err is Human,” physicians and society in general have pursued a legitimate effort to gain perspective and understand the incredibly complex system which is the healthcare system. The increased focus on the degree of quality of healthcare delivery has even yielded into the incorporation of quality metrics that impacts on hospital revenue by CMS. This has prompted healthcare institution to implement changes in practice in order to achieve compliance with the measures and avoid financial penalties. This affects physicians' practice as they need to have enhanced mindfulness around a large number of quality metrics that don't necessarily impact the patients' outcome. The need for change and for creating mindfulness around the quality metrics and performance, has even evolved in the creation of formal quality curriculum for trainees of different…
Dr. Moises Auron is an academic Med-Peds hospitalist at the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. He is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at the Lerner College of Medicine of Case Western Reserve University and a core faculty of the Internal Medicine Residency Training Program. His interests are medical education, acute and perioperative medicine and quality and patient safety. He is the Quality and Patient Safety Officer of the Department of Hospital Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. He has been a member of the Quality and Pediatrics committees at SHM, and is currently a member of the SHM Public Policy committee. Dr. Auron is the Chair-elect of the Council of Early Career Physicians of the American College of Physicians.
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