Archive for October 2015

Leadership Training for the Future, Now

by Ryan Gamlin
by Ryan Gamlin US Health care is in desperate need of leadership from within. And while there is certainly a notable and growing group of physician leaders (think of the Donald Berwicks, Eric Topols, and Bob Watchers of the world), doctors leading systemic change beyond the realm of clinical medicine is a relatively recent phenomenon. Health policy remains principally the domain of policy analysts, health and hospital administration is comprised largely of non-clinicians, and the design of our care delivery systems is often inefficient for patients and providers. Yet with an intimate understanding of the delivery of inpatient care (where the bulk of health care dollars are spent), training in the analysis and solution of complex problems, and a vested interest in the efficient provision and administration of care, there is no group better suited -- yet paradoxically under-equipped -- to drive many of these efforts than hospitalists. The underlying…
Ryan Gamlin is a second year medical student at the University of Cincinnati and alumnus of the University of Colorado Health Innovations Scholars Program. He believes that the challenges facing health are are best solved by those who deliver care. His research interests include efficiency of healthcare administration, composition of the healthcare workforce, and medical education. Before going back to medical school, Ryan was a healthcare management consultant.

A Social Media Success! First #JHMChat by the Numbers

First, thank you to everyone who joined us on October 12th for our first Journal of Hospital Medicine (@JHospMedicine) Twitter chat, known in the Twitterverse as #JHMChat. I was joined on Twitter by Chris Moriates (@chrismoriates) author of a recently published Choosing Wisely: Things We Do for No Reason paper entitled, “Nebulized bronchodilators instead of metered-dose inhalers for obstructive pulmonary symptoms” and we and others asked Dr. Moriates questions about his research and the paper. Interestingly, Chris and I were tweeting from my living room in Chicago, and for a split second, we looked at each other at 8pm CST and had that last minute feeling that it was going to be just us…but boy, were we wrong! Tweeters came out in droves to ask questions, share stories, and also discuss ways to get more people on board with inhalers instead of nebulizers. If you happened to miss it, don’t…

SHM Media Highlights: October 8 – 22

by Brendon Shank
Noteworthy topics affecting hospital medicine – end-of-life care, antibiotic stewardship and patient experience – as well as recent SHM organizational and member successes are included in this edition of media highlights. End-of-life care, an important focus area for hospital medicine and SHM’s Center for Hospital Innovation and Improvement, appeared in Vox and KevinMD. In both blog posts, hospitalists explained the impact of end-of-life care on both patients and themselves as clinicians through firsthand interactions. The prevalence of end-of-life care content in healthcare media is timely, as SHM recently partnered with the Hastings Center to develop training tools for hospitalists to navigate end-of-life care discussions. As SHM prepares for its “Fight the Resistance” campaign in support of antibiotic stewardship next month, an article in Medscape highlighted the dangers of antibiotic resistance and its threats to the safety and efficacy of surgical procedures and immunosuppressive chemotherapy. Antibiotic resistance continues to appear frequently…
Brendon Shank is the Associate Vice President of the Society of Hospital Medicine and is a member of the PRSA Health Academy Executive Committee. You can find him on Twitter, @BShank.

This Football Season, Watch out for This Teammate

Fall means football. Even in Florida where it’s still 90 degrees, we can pretend autumn has arrived, with football on the lawn as a rite of passage. Recently, I was in the front yard playing with my 2 daughters, 7 and 9 years old. We decided to play some 2 on 2, with myself as automatic quarterback, just like the good ole days of backyard football. (Although as a kid there were always fights on who would be QB. I often lost. One of the benefits of being a Dad, I just tell them I’m automatic QB and no one argues. “...because I said so.”) Shayna, the older one, and I drew up a play on her shirt, tracing it out with my finger, hidden from the eyes of the youngest, Lyla. We created some complicated play with a little razzle-dazzle, some goofy faces to distract the opponent, and then a…

What do we do when we can do better?

As hospitalists, we talk a lot about improving quality and patient experience. These are two things that are considered points of emphasis for us. Maybe even points of pride when we point out successes. Unfortunately, sometimes we are just not at our best. Sometimes we are not as connected with our patients as we should be, or we make mistakes. I had one of those weeks my last week on service. “Jay” (not his real name) was my last admission of a very long day. It was late enough that I could have turfed him to my night colleague, but I thought I would just quickly knock this one out. I had taken the triage call from clinic – a previously healthy 36 year-old with progressive shortness of breath. A CT scan done by his primary physician showed multiple bilateral pulmonary emboli. No past medical history, no prior medications and…
123