Archive for May 2014

What Is Your Passion?

Every spring, I wonder, "What I was thinking?"  Spring is the run-up to our Global Health Course at the University of Minnesota, which starts in early May. It has taken myself and others hundreds of hours of planning, meetings, paperwork, phone calls, and e-mails to pull this off.  We are a small program considering the scope of what we do, and we rely heavily on compassionate and interested experts from around the world.  Anything that takes this long to plan begs the question if all of the time input is worthwhile. But shortly after it begins in early May, it becomes clear. Our course is made up of about 2/3 resident physicians across internal medicine, pediatrics, med-peds, family medicine, and emergency medicine, as well as interested attending physicians or providers from the local and national community. Their passion for service and inquiry, in addition to their life experiences are an…

Q&A with David Meltzer MD, PhD: Back to the future with the hospital prone patient

Firstly, thank you David for taking the time to answer questions for the blog.  You got my attention when you expressed, "the greatest excitement you have ever had in your career," for your current CMS Innovation Center endeavor.  Given your list of accomplishments, that is a tall order. Secondly, I want readers to take note of David's latest paper in Health Affairs describing his project, Redesigning Care For Patients At Increased Hospitalization Risk: The Comprehensive Care Physician Model, as well as his presentation at the accompanying publication briefing. 1.  Let me say, if your paper delivers on its promise, we will see a real shake up in the way we deliver care to chronically ill, hospital prone patients.  Based on the oversized attention you received at the Q&A following the briefing, others felt similarly.  Can you review your project and give us the nidus behind developing the intervention? The basic…

Lay Down Your Weapons

Maybe it's the way I was raised, to be polite and sensitive to others; I am a southern girl in so many ways, but I have been a southern expat for some time now weaned on Midwestern practicality. Recently the Nurse Practitioners Modernization Act was introduced in New York. As of January 1st, this law will allow nurse practitioners (NPs) with greater than 3,600 hours of experience to practice without a written practice agreement with a supervising physician. Seventeen states currently have no collaborative practice requirements with physicians. The idea behind this type of legislation is to improve or promote healthcare access for patients who may otherwise not be able to see a physician. The requirements are often viewed as a barrier to practice, as well as a disincentive to registered nurses (RNs) who otherwise would be motivated to pursue advanced certification. NPs easily argue that having to have a…

We dont need studies on whether P4P works. Just read these quotes!

  The United States does not possess sole propriety on P4P.  The NHS has been at the endeavor for years, with mixed results. The NEJM released a short review, Successes and Failures of Pay for Performance in the United Kingdom, and after reading the author's conclusions, one might wonder why we need more study. American exceptionalism aside, across the pond, the UK has done a portion of the scrubbing for us. (more…)

Safety Matters – Especially to Our Patients

by Paul W. Abramowitz, PharmD, ScD, FASHP The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) is dedicated to building relationships within the health care community that strengthen medication and patient safety through interprofessional care. We are excited to have the Society of Hospital Medicine’s (SHM) participation this year in our Medication Safety Collaborative. As health care practitioners, our number one goal is to deliver quality care to patients throughout the entire health care continuum. ASHP’s Medication Safety Collaborative helps to achieve this goal. The collaboration between hospitalists and pharmacists is very important. As medication therapy experts, pharmacists—when working collaboratively with physicians, nurses and other health care practitioners—help to foster optimal models for team-based, patient-centered care. The Medication Safety Collaborative (Collaborative) promotes this by offering a unique interprofessional, educational opportunity to bring together practitioners to build and exchange ideas on improving quality and patient care. The feedback we received about last year’s Collaborative…
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